10 Tips for Creating a Homeschool Workspace

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10 Tips for Creating a Homeschool Workspace

Beyond the heartbreaking losses due to the COVID-19, families are now facing decisions regarding schooling for the upcoming year. Some school districts are still developing a plan, while others have made the difficult decision to offer full/part-time virital learning. Many parents are choosing to homeschool their children due to the pandemic and its risks. If you are a parent faced with homeschooling or vitual learning, I have some ideas for creating a homeschool workspace that is conducive to learning. As with other household decisions, your child will feel ownership over the workspace if you involve them in some of the decisions.

10 Tips for Creating a Homeschool Workspace

  1. Location, location, location – It’s a good idea to involve your child in designing his/her workspace. Find out which space will allow him/her to be productive and inspired to work. This area should feel comfortable yet promote learning. 
  2. Surface Space – Whether it’s a desk, countertop, or dining room table, it’s important your child has a hard surface for writing, completing paperwork or working online.
  3. Comfortable Seating – Just as we prefer a comfortable chair while working, your child will also need seating that fits his/her needs. He/she will be spending a good amount of time sitting, so be sure the chair fits the surface space and allows for proper support of the spine. Also, it’s a good idea to offer variety in seating. For example, your child may prefer to sit in a comfortable chair or lie on the floor when reading. 
  4. Natural Light – Lighting is a dominant factor in the brain’s ability to focus. Natural lighting is best as it facilitates learning, improves behavior, creates less anxiety and stress, and improves overall health. If the space doesn’t provide natural lighting, be sure proper lighting is available. 
  5. Manage the Noise Level – Noise is a common distraction for students. Although some outside noises can’t be controlled, you can manage the noise inside the home. Try to avoid noisy chores such as vacuuming and lawn mowing when your child is studying. Some studies have shown that playing soft music such as classical or smooth jazz can help children with concentration, creativity, and memory.
  6. Organization – An organized workspace is conducive to learning! Start by removing any unnecessary items from the workspace. Next, find items your child will need to keep the area neat and organized. Consider tools for organizing supplies, paperwork, and books. Some workspaces are temporary (like dining room tables), if this is the case, consider purchasing baskets or containers that allow materials to be easily transferred from one area to another.
  7. Decorate the Space – Traditional classrooms often have posters and artwork on the walls to create an inviting work space. Involve your child in decorating the space with fun and colorful items such as his/her art, educational posters, learning aids, etc.
  8. Teacher Area – If you are homeschooling, you will have some teacher supplies. Organize those supplies in one area so they are handy!
  9. Daily Schedule – Whether your child is homeschooling or vitual learning, it’s important to develop a daily schedule that you can stick to as much as possible! Routine is important for children and helps them learn to organize their time.
  10. Leave Time for Breaks – Schedule breaks or watch for those times when your child is feeling restless and hungry. Break times might used for the bathroom, stretching, eating, exercising, getting outdoors, chatting with a friend, and more!

2 comments

  • Liz

    Good tips as we go into a new school year with COVID still looming. I’d say that these are good tips for people working from home too.

  • It’s a different world, that’s for sure. Another idea may be a plain spot behind the student’s sitting area for a non-distracting zoom background 😉 I have to move my computer for every zoom so I’m not just a shadow since there’s usually a window behind me. LOL Stay safe!

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